Why the BA Fine Was So High, and What YOU Can Do To Avoid the Same

I have long maintained that fines under GDPR are the last resort, and that the ICO do NOT want to use Article 83 of the GDPR as a stick to scare organisations into compliance.

The ICO commissioner, Elizabeth Denham has even said as much herself, using the word “nonsense” when it was suggested that large fines would become the norm, that “Issuing fines has always been, and will continue to be, a last resort[…]“, and “While fines may be the sledgehammer in our toolbox, we have access to lots of other tools that are well suited to the task at hand and just as effective […]“.

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How Valid Can the IAPP’s Certifications Be?

I have made no secret of my distain for the ‘GDPR Practitioner Certification‘ badge, and I still have no time for it, or its recipients who pass it off as real-world experience. But what alternatives are there if you want to obtain some form of data protection certification / privacy education?

The de facto standard, and really the only player in town, is the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), and their flagship badge, the Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP), is the most widely recognised and respected acronym you can add to your CV/resume. It’s the equivalent of the CISSP for those of us in the cybersecurity industry.

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GDPR: Here Come the Big[ger] Fines

I have made no secret of my distain (bordering on disgust) for anyone using the GDPR’s ‘administrative fines’ to further their own ends. Whether the ends are selling products, services, or column inches, trying to scare organisations into parting with their hard-earned cash is totally unacceptable and I only hope that most of them have failed.

That said, it is clear from Google (€50M), British Airways (€200+M), and Marriott (€110+M) that enormous fines are now a reality for organisations who egregiously break the law. And make no mistake, they ARE breaking the law. A law that enforces one of OUR fundamental human right.

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Right to Erasure

GDPR: The Right to Erasure Does Not Always Mean Forgotten

The title should actually be more in question form; Did you know that there’s even a difference between being erased and being forgotten?

Article 17 of the GDPR is “Right to erasure (‘right to be forgotten’)“, which suggests they are the same thing. They are not [quite], and I think the only reason the right to be forgotten was added in brackets is because everyone was already calling it that. But it’s just not accurate …enough.

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DPO

Should a CSO/CISO Ever Be a DPO?

I finally figured out why this blog was so damned difficult [for me] to write; I’ve been thinking all wrong about what exactly a DPO actually is. Which is odd, because I had the exact same challenge when writing about CSO/CISOs, and I really should have learned from my mistake.

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