PSD2: The Race to the Consumer

The following things have been clear for a while:

  1. The three and four party models represented by the card schemes are in real danger of being disintermediated as mobile technology advances;
  2. The use of plastic will only begin to fade when consumers have a compelling reason to move, mobile payments alone is insufficient;
  3. Retailers are desperate to engage consumers much earlier in the buying process, as well as for a long time after it;
  4. Identity Management and Authentication will take their rightful place in payments and beyond; and
  5. The average consumer has no idea what they want

What has NOT been clear [to me anyway] is what will be the impetus for thing to actually change, and I never thought it would be a regulation.

But that is exactly what is happening here in the EU. Even a cursory examination of the Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2) makes it clear that the established order is changing. It has already been adopted by the European Parliament, and adoption by the EU Council of Ministers is only a pending formality. Once published, each of the EU countries has just 2 years to write the Directive into their laws.

If you had to distill the PSD2 into its major players, they would be;

  1. Account Servicing Payment Service Provider (ASPSP) – Usually the banks, these guys will need to open up account data once they have received permission to do so from the consumer.
  2. Account Information Service Providers (AISPs) – Aggregators of data received from ASPSPs
  3. Payment Initiation Service Providers (PISPs) – Can initiate a payment, but can only provide a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ in terms of funds availability.

It’s the AISPs that are truly the new guys on the block. Imagine it; a non-bank Third Party Provider (TPP) can, once properly vetted / ‘licensed’ request all the information from all of your banks / financial institutions and display it to you in a single location! The possibilities to money management alone are enormous, but it’s retail that will be the big winners. Well, some retailers.

The reason that retail and TPPs alike should be dribbling at the thought of this is that these centralised ‘Money Managers’ (MMs) are the perfect location to begin the buying process.

You want to buy a TV, so you open your MM app which has already gone through the effort to combine feeds from all of the following:

  1. Retailers – If retailers do not provide feeds of stock, deals, locations, terms and so on, these will not be presented to the consumer as an option
  2. Ratings & Reviews – Few people realise what goers into those 5 stars you see on Amazon and the like, but you’d be surprised how much influence they have
  3. Your Finances – No point looking if you can’t afford it

Then, once you have gone through a nice friendly wizard to narrow down what you are looking for, your MM goes out and looks for the best deal, AND offers you the best payment terms from all of your lenders. And the WAY you pay? What do you care, the MM has already determined the best way and took care of the detail?!

Those steps may not sound all that radical, but there are two incredibly important facts here:

1) the holder of your money has become far less relevant, so even the banks themselves are losing the Race to the Consumer, and

2) consumers will stop caring HOW they pay in terms of channel, making every other intermediary in the current payment ecosystem irrelevant.

This is what your money is, a stored value, why SHOULD you care if it’s direct debit, standing order, or branded card as long as it’s the best deal for you. It all comes back to you anyway.

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