PCI – Going Beyond the Standard: Part 24, Disaster Recovery (DR) & Business Continuity Management (BCM)

You may be wondering why I would put this after Governance seeing as that seems to bring everything together, and you may also be wondering why I did not included Disaster Recovery (DR) in the same post as Incident Response (IR) which everyone else always does.

They would be good questions, and my reasoning is relatively simple; You cannot HAVE Business Continuity Management (BCM) without Governance so that must be formalised first, DR represents the detailed processes summarised in the BCM, and IR is the feed INTO the DR/BCM, not the output from it.

To put it another way; the Business Continuity Plan (BCP) details what must be done, in what order, and how quickly to save the business, DR puts that plan into effect, and IR would have uncovered the inciting incident that brought both the BCP and DR plans into play in the first place.

Assuming that made any sense, the question is; What if I don’t HAVE a BCP?

I am surprised every time I ask a client for a BCP and don’t get one. Mostly because I’m not too bright, but partly because it makes absolutely no sense to me that ANY organisation in any industry sector, anywhere in the world would not make such a simple effort to help themselves STAY in business. While both DR and BCP represent what amounts to contingency planning and will hopefully never have to be invoked (assuming your IR is top notch of course), NOT having a plan is nothing short of irresponsible.

There are several well known standards related to Business Continuity, and for obvious reasons they encompass more than just IT systems:

  1. ISO 22301:2012: Societal security — Business continuity management systems – Requirements
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  2. ISO 22313:2012: Societal security — Business continuity management systems – Guidance
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  3. ISO/IEC 27031:2011: Information security – Security techniques — Guidelines for information and communication technology [ICT] readiness for business continuity
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  4. NIST Special Publication 800-34 Rev. 1, Contingency Planning Guide for Federal Information Systems
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  5. ANSI/ASIS SPC.1-2009 Organizational Resilience: Security, Preparedness, and Continuity Management Systems

Unfortunately the ISO stuff will set you back a few hundred quid, so start with the NIST / ANSI stuff to ge yourself familiar enough with the concept to at least ask the right questions.

For DR, start with mapping out all of your business processes and asset dependencies. If you don’t know how things fit together, you’ll have no idea how to put them back in place. Clearly, if your asset management processes are not robust, you can’t even begin the mapping process, so get that done first.

Once you have mapped out your business processes, it’s a relatively simple task to organise all of your procedural documentation into how you reestablish all the moving parts. You have all that, right? So whether you have full redundancy in all things, hot swap, warm spares or a whole host of other DR clichés, how you get your systems back online boils down to a series of easily followed instructions.

From an IT perspective, all the BCP plan does is tell you in which order to bring those systems back online and in what timeframe. It should be needless to say – but it isn’t – the plan and all of its moving parts must be tested on an annual basis or even explicit instructions cannot get the response times to an optimal state.

No aspect of security should be performed half-arsed, DR and BCP processes are no exception. Even within the field of security BCP is a speciality, and making the plan simple and appropriate is a talent more than a skill. Expect to pay a lot for these services but rest assured it is money well spent.

If you think I'm wrong, please tell me why!

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