CISO Lifespan

Why CSOs / CISOs Only Have a 2 Year Lifespan

In previous blogs I expanded upon two main reasons why CISOs seem to have such a limited lifespan, and why the role is currently one of the most difficult senior leadership roles to both fulfil, and stay in long-term.

In Make the CSO Role a Board Appointment, or Don’t Bother Having One I touched upon the fact that so few CSOs; 1) are hired by the right people or for the right reasons, 2) report to the correct hierarchy, and 3) have the necessary support from the people from whom they need it most.

In The 3 Types of CISO: Know Which You Need I tried to explain why there is effectively no such thing as an ‘all-rounder’ CISO, so expectations are already completely out of line with reality.

I’ve now come up with a 3rd; Expecting the CISO alone to fix everything.

While this may be a byproduct of the first two, it is nevertheless important enough to be addressed by itself. And for once, I can’t actually blame the CEO entirely for this issue, the CISO is every bit as culpable.

Consider this scenario; An organisation, for whatever reason, decides it needs a security expert in senior management. Even if the BoD does get involved from the beginning, the organisation will end up writing a job description of some sort. This is no different from going to the Doctor’s, diagnosing yourself, and writing your own prescription.

This description will then be advertised in some fashion, guaranteeing that the only people who respond are the ones wholly unqualified to fill it. In the same way that anyone who wants to be in politics should be stopped from doing so, anyone who responds to a CISO role that they didn’t draft themselves has no idea what they are doing.

There is only one exception to this, and that’s if the organisation has already put the basics of a security program in place and need someone to optimise it. Everything before this is a series of consulting gigs, the aim of which is to prepare the organisation’s security program to the point a CISO can come in and run with it.

So, whether you’re an organisation looking for a long-term CISO, or a CISO looking for a long-term gig, what do you do?

A Security Program in 10 Difficult-as-Hell Steps

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Clearly there are many steps in between these, as none of this appropriately addresses two of the most important aspects of any security program; 1) Senior Leadership’s role in changing the corporate culture, and 2) a Knowledge Management program personified by documented processes and procedures.

But in no way do I wish to downplay the CISO role to one of a babysitter, it is still one of the most difficult roles imaginable. However, I have never met a CISO who joined an organisation at Step 1, and was still the CISO a year or so later. Because the CISO role is perceived by many security professionals as the pinnacle of their career, too few ask the hard questions before committing;

  1. Has the organisation followed the 10 steps? – If no, where are they in the process?. If yes;
  2. Am I right for the job? – If no, can I help them find someone who is. If yes;
  3. Do I really want the job? – Go in with your eyes wide open, or again, walk away.

As long as both the organisation and the prospective CISO are fully aware of these issues, there is no reason a CISO can’t go the distance. That said, there is no reason a security program can’t be put on track without one…

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