PCI – Going Beyond the Standard: Part 22, Compliance Validation

This is often where an assessment starts going truly pear-shaped. Mostly because of assumptions, but a large chunk of what makes validation of compliance so difficult is the lack of mechanisms to make it anything other than a manual process. There is no requirement for automation in PCI, so going beyond the standard is very simple.

First, let’s start out with the worst assumption; that sampling is a right. It’s not, it’s a privilege, and one you have to earn. Until you can show your assessor that you have ALL of the following in place, sampling isn’t even an option:

  1. Formalised, and Robust Configuration Management – Unless you can show that you have a VERY good handle on configuring ‘like systems’ in an identical fashion, sampling cannot be performed. All web servers, app servers, DB servers etc must start out exactly the same. From installation from a known-good base image, to configuration of applications, to testing through change control prior to promotion into production, there is no room for ad hoc here.
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  2. Centralised Management and Maintenance –  You must be able to show your QSA that you have the ability to KEEP your like-systems identical, so if you have a centralised console where this can be displayed, so much the better. WSUS for Windows, or CiscoWorks for Cisco network devices for example, can centrally display pretty much all you need to know about the systems. OS, version, patches and so on.
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  3. Centralised Logging and Monitoring – An extension to management, log baselines, like-system thresholds, and incident response etc. must be centralised or every different monitoring process must be examined individually.

Of the three facets above, PCI does not require any of them to be centralised, not even logging, so if none of these things are in place, there is no sampling.

An operating system has 12 validation points (access control, password setting, logging and so), applications have 9, and a DB has 7. In theory, a single system could require 28 separate pieces of evidence to validate its compliance.

What if you had a 100 of these systems?

I have expounded many times the concept of security being simple, not easy, but simple. Well, there is no simple without centralisation, and it’s VERY difficult to achieve simple without some form of automation.

For PCI, a screen shot of the AV [for example] settings will suffice, but this can involved the collection of MANY screenshots. How much better to have a centralised management station that shows these settings against all systems in one place? The same applies to logging, access control mechanisms, FIM, running services / listening ports (i.e. configuration standards) and almost every other validation requirement at the system level.

In the hundreds of assessment with which I have in some way been involved, I would estimate that between 25% and 40% of an assessment’s effort is related to gathering of validation evidence. That’s in year one, it’s actually greater in subsequent years, but the effort to get to the point of validation SHOULD have been less.

But that’s really the point here, and the point of the SSC’s recent supplemental on staying compliant; if you treat validation of compliance as a project, you are wasting a significant amount of resources AND you are no closer to actually being secure.

Compliance requires no automation, but without it you have no continuous compliance validation. PCI requires no centralisation, but without that you simply cannot manage what you have efficiently and effectively.

Validation is easy when your security program is simple, because the management of your program is simple. Spending weeks collecting evidence for compliance could not be a more ridiculous use of your time.

Simple is cheaper, more efficient, easier to manage and measure, and above all, more secure. Validation of compliance falls out of the back of a security program done well, so work on that first.

 

 

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