PCI – Going Beyond the Standard: Part 20, Incident Response (IR)

First, you may be asking why this blog does not include Disaster Recovery (DR) and Business Continuity Management (BCM, which governs the entire IR / DR process). Because the PCI DSS section 12.10.x is almost entirely related to IR (with the exception of a VERY brief nod to DR / BCP, below in red), I will handle DR / BCP separately in the series (post 23 in fact).

“12.10.1 – Create the incident response plan to be implemented in the event of system breach. Ensure the plan addresses the following, at a minimum:

    • Roles, responsibilities, and communication and contact strategies in the event of a compromise including notification of the payment brands, at a minimum
    • Specific incident response procedures
    • Business recovery and continuity procedures [This is the only requirement in the DSS that goes beyond the protection of CHD.]
    • Data backup processes
    • Analysis of legal requirements for reporting compromises * Coverage and responses of all critical system components
    • Reference or inclusion of incident response procedures from the payment brands.

With regard Incident Response, I put it this way; “What’s the point of being in business, if you don’t intend staying in business?”, and; “Good incident response is what prevents a security event from becoming a business crippling disaster.”

It makes absolutely no sense to me that organisations who basically depend on IT for significant chunks of income (which is most of them), have very little idea how to stop bad things from happening in the first place, let alone fix things when they go wrong. Of course, no incident response is going to predict an earthquake at the datacenter, but the organisations I’ve seen don’t even perform log monitoring properly, let alone consider the impact of acts of nature.

The development of a good incident response plan start with? Yep, a good policy, from there you agree on an appropriate Risk Assessment / Business Impact Analysis process, which in turn provides you everything you need to not only determine if you have any control gaps (after a gap analysis), but – if you’ve done it properly – a good indication of what your incident response and disaster recovery plans should entail.

There is no appropriate IR without an understanding of the business goals. If you have a 4 hour Recovery Time Objective (RTO), your IR will be significantly more robust than one where you can take a week to be back online. Yes, I know that RTOs (and RPOs (Recovery Point Objective for that matter) are DR terms, but if your incident response cannot detect a business crippling event in good time, then neither of those DR goals is an option for you.

When setting up your IR program, the most important word to keep in mind is ‘baseline’. Without a baseline, you don’t have much of a concept of what constitutes an incident in the first place. Only a baseline can give you both context and relevance.

From your baselined system configuration standards (DSS 2.x), to AV (DSS 5.x), to logging (DSS 10.x), to scanning (DSS 11.1.x, and 11.2.x), to FIM (DSS 11.5.x), you have many available inputs into your IR program, none of which will be of the slightest help if you don’t know what they SHOULD look like.

That’s all IR is;, a process whereby an exception to the norm is investigated, and appropriate action taken.

In each of my individual going-beyond-the-standard blogs related to the above DSS requirements, I have stressed the importance of baselining (well, except AV perhaps). The reason I did so was because they all lead up to this. I don’t care how well you have done ANY of the previous requirements, unless you can bring the outputs all together into a comprehensive process of taking action, all you have is a bunch of data to give to your forensics investigator.

You’ll notice though that I did not say a CENTRAL process, because while having a 24X7 Security Operations Centre t manage all of this, it’s rarely practical, even if it involves a outsourced managed service provider (MSP). However, having the correct assignments and procedures to MANAGE the response is of utmost importance, and the details of this plan will vary considerably from company to company.

No IR is not easy, but there is simply too much information and help out there for this difficulty to be any sort of excuse. And no, there is not much in this blog that actually provides guidance, but if this makes SENSE, then you at have at least got enough to begin to ask the right questions.

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