From Corporate, to Start-Up, and Back Again

In 2013 I was made redundant from a company where I had worked for the previous 12.5 years. I had grown with the company from the 14th person to join (as a firewall admin) to a position leading 28 people across 14 time zones in a company of over 1,000.

I subsequently discovered that I was basically unhirable, so I started my own consulting practice, which I thoroughly enjoyed. I then joined a very small start-up for a year, which I thoroughly enjoyed, and went back to my own practice.

I swore up and down that I would never go corporate, ever again. I convinced myself that there was never enough freedom, or room for innovation, or ability to make a difference in a large organisation to EVER go back. Not that ‘corporate’ would ever have me back.

Now here I am, at the end of my 3rd week at an organisation that is bigger by far than any I have ever worked for previously.

…and I’m thoroughly enjoying it.

Many times in the course of my blogs I have expounded on the need for self-reflection, on being honest with yourself enough to know when something was entirely your fault, and to adjust your career choices accordingly. Well clearly I had mistaken ‘corporate’ for my own inability to effectively create the change needed to stop me from being made “redundant”.

While I’m not saying I now have that ability, as I will always have a big mouth, when you’re in an organisation who ALL seem to want the change you’ve craved your whole career, it’s a feeling unlike I’ve ever experienced at work. I’ve never needed, or even particularly wanted, to be part of a team growing up, I now find myself in one.

…and I like it.

Frankly I’m not even sure why I’m writing this blog, except perhaps as a tip for those who find themselves in a position where they cannot decide on what’s the right place for them to work. Corporate, start-up, self-employed, or somewhere in between. Every one of my jobs had its benefits, and had its downsides, and I’m under no illusion that this one will be the same. The only difference this time, is that I have now seen both sides of the fence.

It’s not the fence that matters, your skills and talents have no fences.

The only reason I think that corporate fails to attract the truly entrepreneurial is that they are still very attached to job titles and descriptions, effectively pigeon-holing a person into a role that will always limit them. It’s the organisations that go looking for talents to fill known functional gaps, but then get out of the person’s way, that will attract the game changers.

Not saying I’m a game changer, but my title was only assigned to complete a field in the HR system, and my job description was a run-down of the challenges my new organisation was facing. And in just 3 weeks I have not only learned more than I did in the last 6 months, I have a learning curve ahead of me for which I can see no end.

I loved running my own business, and have no regrets about the start-up, but this little adventure is a revelation that has me very excited for the future. And the lesson I learned from all this?;

Don’t limit where you look for your next job, just ask the right questions.

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[Ed. June 2016: Clearly this gig did not work out, but I am still not against trying again for the right organisation.]

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