DPO

Should a CSO/CISO Ever Be a DPO?

I finally figured out why this blog was so damned difficult [for me] to write; I’ve been thinking all wrong about what exactly a DPO actually is. Which is odd, because I had the exact same challenge when writing about CSO/CISOs, and I really should have learned from my mistake.

When you think about a CISO (assume this also means CSO), or a DPO, you instantly picture a person. Maybe your organisation already has one so their face springs to mind, or if not, you have a indistinct and faceless image of someone in a suit. The fact is, neither the CISO nor the DPO are people, they are functions. Multiple functions in fact.

And not only that, they involve multiple disciplines, skill-sets, even personal preferences. Most importantly, neither the CISO nor the DPO functions [performed correctly] are ever a single person. A DPO would, quite literally, have to be an expert in privacy law (both EU and national), contracts, risk management, policy development, distribution and audit, and understand all personal data flows throughout the business.

You therefore need to break the function down before you can move forward. For example; I broke the CISO function down into 3 distinct skill-sets/phases: Continue reading

Information Security vs Privacy

Information Security vs Privacy, are the Lines Blurring?

My original title was “Data Security vs Data Protection[…]”, but an unfortunate number of people see these as pretty much the same thing, even interchangeable. Then I chose Cybersecurity instead of Data Security but that doesn’t cover all forms/formats of personal data, so I finally had to settle on Information Security.

As for Data Protection, it’s not, in and of itself Privacy, and so on…

But you see the problem already? If we can’t even agree on common terminology, how are we expected to ask the right people the right questions in order to solve our problems? But I digress…

For the purposes of this blog I have chosen the following definitions of ‘Information Security’ and ‘Privacy’: Continue reading

Privacy

The Right to Privacy: Don’t Tell Me I Have to Care!

I’ve already written on the subject of privacy several times, and will likely be regurgitating a lot of what I’ve said previously, but an article I read last week really pissed me off; Three Reasons Why the “Nothing to Hide” Argument is Flawed. It’s exactly this kind of absolutist nonsense [from both sides of the privacy ‘debate’] that makes true progress so bloody difficult.

Their first point:1) Privacy isn’t about hiding information; privacy is about protecting information, and surely you have information that you’d like to protect.” is backed up by several metaphors, one of which is “Do you close the door when you go to the bathroom?” Seriously? Even the Universal Declaration of Human Rights qualifies the right to privacy with the word ‘arbitrary’:

“Article 12 – No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation. Everyone has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.”

Every other treatise [that I’ve read] on privacy has a similar qualifier, which clearly infers that there can be very good reasons for ‘interference’. This is further supported by the fact that privacy is only a fundamental right, not an absolute right. Continue reading

GDPR Deadline

GDPR: May 25th is NOT a Deadline!

It seems there are only two ways to sell GDPR products and services:

  1. Tell everyone they are going to get fined €20M or 4% of their annual revenue; and
  2. Tell everyone that they only have until May 25th to get compliant or they’re in big trouble

These are both utter nonsense.

While the monster fines are a theoretical possibility (per Article 83), I would hope by that you know they will be reserved for the VERY worst offenders. If you don’t, read this from the UK’s Information Commissioner herself; GDPR – sorting the fact from the fiction. With my favourite quote being:

Issuing fines has always been and will continue to be, a last resort. Last year (2016/2017) we concluded 17,300 cases. I can tell you that 16 of them resulted in fines for the organisations concerned.”

And not one of these 16 (0.09% of the total!) was anywhere near the maximum of £500K, so forget the damned fines!! Unless of course you work for a bunch of total scumbags like Keurboom, then I hope you get completely reamed.

Anyway, so here we are, less than 3 months away from May 25th, and the ‘deadline’ for compliance is the most prevalent scare tactic!

“Get compliant before May 25th or else!!” “Deadline fast approaching!!” “Trust me, I’m a certified practitioner!!”

The thing is, “or else” what, exactly? What do you think is going to happen on May 25th? That your supervisory authority is going to be banging on your door with cries of “Article 30!! Show us your records!!“? Do you expect to receive hundreds of requests for access from people who know even less about GDPR than almost anyone reading this blog? Do you think you’ll suddenly be the subject of a class action suit?

Do you think your supervisory authority even knows who you ARE at this point? [No offence]

I’ll tell you what’s going to happen on May 25th …not a bloody thing different. It will be business as usual.

However, what WILL happen from May ONWARDS is a gradual increase in how the GDPR is enforced in each member state. Guidance from supervisory authorities will increase in-line with the real-world issues they face; certification mechanisms will be released forcing all organisations to at least review and consider them; the general public will gradually come to expect the heightened protection mechanisms and vilify those organisation who are not up to speed and so on.

To put this another way; Data Protection law is not going away and cannot be ignored. By anyone. In fact, in light of things like AI/ML, Big Data and the Internet of Things, data protection is only going to become more embedded in everything we do. It has to, and you need to keep up with it.

So the more time that passes the fewer excuses you will have for doing nothing, regardless of the size / type / industry vertical in which your business operates. In the UK for example you are already 20 years too late to be proactive. The DPA has been out since 1998 and compliance to it would have covered the lion’s share of the GDPR. Which itself has been out for almost 2 year.

While I can sympathise with organisations fumbling around but doing their best, I have little sympathy for organisations who have done nothing. It’s these folks who should be the most concerned, not for May 25th, but every day after it.

Not one organisation out there is incapable of doing these 6 things before the ‘deadline’. Not to completion perhaps, but a good chunk:

  1. Find out where all your personal data is; – [even crappy questionnaires and interviews will get you most of the way there]
  2. Map that data to the business processes that created it; – [HR, Sales, Marketing and so on…]
  3. Agree on which business processes should continue as they are, which should change, and which should stop altogether;
  4. Get rid of all instances of personal data that do not support the agreed business processes;
  5. Obtain appropriate guidance on the lawful basis(es) for processing what’s left; and
  6. Commit, in writing, at the Board level, to achieving full compliance

While this is nowhere near a full demonstration of compliance, you have done 3 things that the ICO have every right to expect. You have:

  1. reduced your risk by minimising your threat exposure – you can’t lose or misuse what you don’t have;
  2. done your best to ensure that you are supporting the data subject’s rights – the whole point of this exercise; and
  3. MADE A BLOODY START!

I don’t care if you only achieve full compliance 5 years from now, and it’s unlikely the supervisory authorities will, if, and ONLY if:

  1. Your commitment is real;
  2. You have a plan; and
  3. You don’t get reported or breached

It’s up to you to do ENOUGH now to make sure 3. doesn’t happen, work on the rest when you can. Just make sure you can justify your timelines.

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[Ed – It’s good to see that the message is getting out there, even across the pond; GDPR – Five Myths Debunked]

PIN on Mobile

PCI: Software-Based PIN Entry on COTS (a.k.a. PIN-on-Mobile)

Almost four YEARS ago I wrote Software PIN, the Rosetta Stone of Future Payments, then just over a year later I wrote; Mobile Authentication: Exceeding Card Present Security?

Just this month the SSC finally came out with their Software-Based PIN Entry on COTS Security Requirements v1.0.

[Ed. While I don’t have to wonder why PIN was my primary focus, I can see how pointless it was …almost. It just makes the delay on this standard that much more inexcusable.]

On with the story… Software PIN is more commonly referred to as PIN-on-Mobile (or the catchier PIN-on-Glass), and is the ‘game-changing’ technology that will; “enable merchants to accept PIN-based payments with the PIN entered on a commercial off-the-shelf device, such as a consumer-grade mobile phone or tablet.”

What has taken them so long to make what – from my jaded perspective – is the only move that will delay their inevitable demise? It’s not like there was some miraculous innovation in mobile or encryption technology in the last couple of years! Every requirement in the standard was available/achievable long before I even wrote my blogs. As were viable solutions for that matter.

I suspect there’s lots of reasons of why they were so slow, but chief amongst these has to be their complete inability to adapt to the fast-paced innovation rampant in the FinTech industry. Especially given their hopelessly antiquated technology. It’s only their global adoption and sheer ubiquity that keeps them where they are. I blame the banks too, change for them means acceptance of liability.

Come to think of it, what an amazing coincidence that PSD2 – the biggest nail in the payment card’s coffin since …well ever, came out this month as well. Weird huh?

As far as I am concerned, PIN-on-Mobile was the card brand’s last hold-out, now they’re done. Hopefully between the XYZ-Pays (ApplePay, SamsungPay etc.) and now the entry of cardholder PIN on [almost] any CoTS device, big merchants / retail associations will finally have the balls to stand up for themselves.

How many millions have they spent in the US on EMV terminals just to find out a few years later that it was not only entirely unnecessary, but they’re now tied into an investment that will leave them lagging behind their competition who were slower of the EMV block?

I know that’s harsh, and we really have no right to judge. Have any of the following questions ever occurred to you?:

  1. If I can use my phone to pay for something, why do I have to tie that payment to a branded card?;
  2. With all of the security requirements required for the entry of a software PIN, why the Hell do I still have to use one? In other words, if it’s that bloody difficult to secure it, why not use something else?; and
  3. Isn’t there a better way!?

If you’re like the majority of the population, these questions are more like:

  1. Why doesn’t MY bank support this?! (looking at YOU Barclay Business!), or more commonly; why would I use this service when I have a piece of plastic?;
  2. What’s wrong with PIN?; and
  3. [nothing]

The fact is that the lion’s share of the cashless transactions globally are performed by those who have never known a time before payment cards. We simply can’t imagine anything else and we don’t even notice their inconvenience. We also don’t see the costs imposed by the middlemen.

But let me ask you this; Would you ever go back to using a feature phone? I’ll [almost] guarantee that you had no idea what features you wanted in a phone until you used a smartphone for the first time. And now you can’t live without it. Hell, most of us can’t even put the damned things down!

The same thing WILL happen to payments, but not until consumer indifference is overcome by something shiny and new.

Frankly this blog is boring even to me, and I really have nothing more to say about payment innovation that I have not already said a hundred times. But I simply can’t let anything so patently meaningless as PIN on Mobile to go unanswered.

Innovation my arse.

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