ISO 27001 Certification

How to Begin Your ISO 27001 Certification Project

There are many consultants with significantly more ISO 27001 experience than I have. And type “how to begin ISO 27001” into Google and you’ll get ~8.2 million hits. So what makes me think I can do any better?

Actually, I not saying I can, but I am saying that my style of consulting seems to be conducive to getting such difficult projects off the ground quickly. Or at all for that matter. No security project is more difficult that implementing an ISMS.

In last week’s blog; ISO 27001 Certification, Is It Really Worth It? I stated that the top 5 reasons that ISO certification projects fail are:

  1. Grossly underestimating the level of effort;
  2. Doing it just to land a big contract (or for marketing purposes);
  3. Tying the certification to an overly aggressive deadline;
  4. Ignoring the expert help; and
  5. Having no business goals in mind.

It follows therefore that to make certification a success, you must overcome these challenges at a minimum. Sadly, nothing I say from this point point forward will be in any way new. Some of what I have to say has been said dozens of times by me, and thousands of times by my peers and betters.

The Challenges

  1. Grossly underestimating the level of effort – Symptomatic of one thing; asking the wrong questions. If you had asked the right people the right questions you would KNOW just how difficult an ISO certification project is. No certification should be undertaken lightly, but there are more than enough ISO experts out there to make the level of effort abundantly clear.
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  2. Doing it just to land a big contract (or for marketing purposes) – While I can empathise with this one, allowing what amounts to greed to provide the entire impetus for something that requires a fundamental shift in culture is naive at best. The promise of a big contract can, and often does, provide the initial business case for ISO certification. But to then focus entirely on doing just enough to land that project is a total waste of time and effort. Many good consultants will rightly walk away from such projects. It’s our reputation too.
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  3. Tying the certification to an overly aggressive deadline – Usually an extension of 2 above, and will invariable derail the project before it begins. If all you’re focused on is a looming deadline, nothing will be done properly, nor will it be sustainable. Remember, ISO certification requires 6 month health checks, an unsustained ISMS will result in the removal of your certification. Quite right too.
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  4. Ignoring the expert help – You don’t go to the doctor and tell them you have a brain tumour. You tell them you have a headache and let them do the rest. So why would you hire an ISO expert them argue with every step of the way just because you don’t like what you hear? A good consultant will not ask you for anything they already have, or they do not need, so either do the work or stop the project if it’s too much.
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  5. Having no business goals in mind – Contracts, even very large ones, are not business goals, they are a means to achieving a business goal. Done correctly, an ISMS can enable almost every goal you’d care to mention. Done correctly. Before you begin your project, find out what your CEO’s goals are and map the ISMS efforts to them. Miss this step and you will fail every time.

I use the word ‘recommend’ very carefully, but I HIGHLY recommend that you put all the relevant stakeholders through a 1 day ISMS training session to set the scene. Without this context, you will have no support.

If the CEO can’t even make an appearance at this session, that will tell you all you need to know about how your project is going to go.

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