Social Media Is Killing Customer Service

In a truly stunning service provider fail, I was without Internet access at home for 14 straight days. FOURTEEN DAYS!! But at least my service provider responded promptly on social media.

I won’t tell you who my provider is [virgin media cough], but as someone who works from home, not having Internet is a severe liability. I also happen to work in Internet security, so the vast majority of my day is spent faffing around online. At least my data was safe I guess.

It’s not so much that I was without access for so long, bad things happen, it’s that I STILL don’t know why! To be told every day that it’s a “known fault” and that it will be ‘resolved by 2PM tomorrow” makes an utter mockery of customer service. Not once did they update their site with an outage statement, not once did they call us with updates, and not once did they tell us what the issue was.

For God’s sake, my next door neighbour had Internet access from the same provider! Literally, next door, I’m at 45, they’re at 47.

Enough background, now to my real issue; While their actual customer service left a lot to be desired, their social media department was totally on the ball. And no, that’s not a good thing. About 30 seconds after we Tweeted about the disgraceful service their rep was back to us apologetic and full of concern.

What’s wrong with that you might ask? Well…

  1. They had no access to our account, so they could not even speak to the issue;
  2. They had no access to tech support to find out what was actually wrong;
  3. Once they realised they were making things worse they referred me to their utterly pointless Code of Practice;
  4. They kept no record of their previous contact so every subsequent bad Tweet was followed by the exact same conversation, and;
  5. Zero follow-up, zero accountability.

Bottom line; customer service over social media is nothing more than an attempt to protect their online image. At no point was this ever an attempt to actually help.

Customer Service is both an art and a science, and is one of the few competitive advantages left in the digital world. It should be pro-active, an extension of an organisation’s values, and absolutely cannot be faked. Most people I know would stick with a lesser product / service if they believed their provider actually cared.

I have never understood the visceral resistance to admitting that you’ve messed up. It’s akin to one of my favourite lines in The Dark Knight when the Joker says “You know what I’ve noticed? Nobody panics when things go “according to plan.” Even if the plan is horrifying! If, tomorrow, I tell the press that, like, a gang banger will get shot, or a truckload of soldiers will be blown up, nobody panics, because it’s all “part of the plan.

In this case, all my service provider had to do was tell me the minute they knew there was a problem, which was 4 days before the line went down. Then, if they had just keep me pro-actively informed on progress, I would have only been disappointed, not angry. Of course, it would have been great if they had offered to provide a temporary alternative, like a MiFi for example, but this was not necessary. They would have made a loss on the month, but they would have earned years of my loyalty.

As things are today, I will not only leave my current provider as soon as there is a viable alternative, but I will actively dissuade anyone from using them.

Social media is a critical aspect of customer service, but only if these two things are seen as intrinsic components of the right corporate values. If not, you’re just pandering, and I for one will not be pandered to.

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