Document Management System, How’d I Miss That!?

In all my years performing security assessments, and even providing my own policy and procedure service, somehow I have completely missed out on HOW to actually manage the polices, standards and procedures. Yet I have harped on about them incessantly.

Yes, I have mention a Document Management System (DMS) as a way of controlling and distributing documents, but I had never really given thought as to how you would go about maintaining a library of documents that almost all organisation collect over time.

It may not sound like an important subject, until you realise that no policy, standard, or procedure means anything unless it’s the RIGHT one. Is the procedure you’re working from the latest version? Are you in violation of a policy that can lead to you getting fired because you’re looking at a printed copy from 2014? Are you holding your vendors accountable to SLAs in the latest contract?

The first thing I have noticed is that it’s incredible easy to over-complicate the whole thing to the point it’s unsustainable. It must be intuitive for anyone to follow, and it must be easy to manage, or like everything else in security, it will be bypassed.

I would love to hear from true expert on how this is done, but for now, he is what I think is best:

  1. Document Numbering: Have enough information that you know at a glance what the document is, but not so much that it’s 100 characters long. For example;

    * First 2 characters is the company name, or a designation of external (e.g. CN, or EX)
    * Second 2 characters is the document type (e.g. PO = Policy, PR = Procedure etc.)
    * Third 2 characters is the applicable region (e.g. GL = Global, GB = United Kingdom, etc.)
    * Fourth 2 characters is the applicable department (e.g. XX = All departments, LG = Legal, SE = Security etc.)
    * Last 4 characters is the unique number (e.g. 0000 – 9999)

  2. Revision Number:  rX.0 for major release, and rX.1 for a minor release. So the first draft would be r1.0, a slight change would be r1.1, and a complete rewrite would be r2.0 and so on.
  3. Friendly Name: What’s the document title? e.g. “Access Control Policy”
  4. Document Status: One of only 3 things; DRAFT, RELEASED, or OBSOLETE, all self-explanatory

So, for Acme Rockets Ltd., a first draft of a global legal policy on access control would be; ‘AR-PO-GL-LE-0001-r0.1 – Access Control Policy-DRAFT‘, or a rewrite of a vendor contract related to  a firewall managed service procedure specific to the UK would be; ‘EX-PR-GB-SE-0003-r2.0 – Firewall Managed Service Procedure-RELEASED

Assuming I haven’t completely lost you, the next step is to work out how to get them into a centralised and access controlled library to which EVERYONE who needs access, has it. Every RELEASED version of the entire policy and procedure set needs to be online and the location of it familiar to the entire company. No printed version can ever be trusted unless the number, name, and status matches (these should be printed in the document header).

Finally, and here’s the real kicker; EVERY document in use in the organisation needs to be entered into a Master Documents Record (MDR) of some sort, and maintained to an extremely high degree of integrity. In theory you could use your Intranet or SharePoint for the central location and an Excel spreadsheet for your MDR, but best of luck keeping that up to date in a large org.

So, am I, David Froud, actually suggesting that larger organisations buy technology to solve a business problem despite my constant warnings not to do so?

Yes, yes I am.