Reasonable Security Measures

GDPR: How Do You Define ‘Appropriate’ Security Measures?

Ask a lawyer what ‘appropriate’ or ‘reasonable’ means and they’ll come back with something like; “What would be considered fair by a disinterested third party with sufficient knowledge of the facts.”, or “Fair, proper, or moderate under the circumstances.”

Now translate that into what kind of security measures are considered appropriate? How would you justify that what you are doing is reasonable, fair, or proper under the circumstances?

Because that’s what you’ll have to do if things go wrong under GDPR. You’ll have to justify that the measures you took to protect personal data were underpinned by an appropriate program for measuring and treating risk. If your breach was shown to be anything other than a determined attacker, all you’ll have in your defence will be poor excuses. This is no better than negligence.

When you consider that the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – and every other regulatory compliance for the matter – was written by lawyers, should we not be able to work out what ‘appropriate’ means for a security program? After all, lawyers have no problem defining the word ‘reasonable’, they even apply it to their fees!

The good news is that the process is not only well known, it’s simple; it’s called Risk Management, and it’s been around for decades.

Step 1: Complete your Asset Register;

Step 2: Map your assets to your business processes (which should already be mapped to revenue);

Step 3: Map your business processes to your business goals;

Step 4: Run a Risk Assessment against all business processes and / or key IT systems;

Step 5: Document the business impact of each risk (mapped against both revenue and business goals);

Step 6: Document Senior Leadership’s risk appetite against each business goal;

Step 7: Perform full analysis of security controls, determine if there are any gaps between the current state and the risk appetite;

Step 8: Fill the gaps;

Step 9: Document everything; and

Step 10: Repeat annually, or prior to any major changes.

Now put yourself in the shoes of an auditor after you have been breached. What are they going to ask you for? What could anyone reasonably expect you to have in place if you were taking your duties seriously?

If I was an auditor I’d ask for 5 things up front, as without them I know there is no way you have an appropriate security program in place:

  1. A mapping of your policies, standard and procedures to whatever security framework you based your security program on;
  2. Your risk assessment procedure, and the results of the last one conducted;
  3. Your risk register;
  4. Your change control procedure; and
  5. Your incident response procedure.

At this stage I would care nothing for your technology, or how much you spent on it. A technology purchase outside of a properly defined business need is nothing more than smoke and mirrors. Besides, no regulator has ever tried to qualify how much you spent. It’s up to you to show why you spent what you did, and why you didn’t spend more.

The thing to bear in mind here is that the validation of ‘appropriateness’ is not a conversation, it’s documentation. It’s not even evidence of the technologies you have running, it’s showing that the technologies you do have meet the risk you have defined. While from a lawyer’s perspective, appropriate is demonstrated by precedent, in cybersecurity, appropriate is demonstrated by the extent and capability of your security program.

Complying with the cybersecurity elements of the GDPR is simple, every step is written down for you somewhere. There are a few things to bear in mind though:

  1. GDPR is 95% about how you get the data, and what you then do with it when you have it. Anything you spend on security should be justified against the business goals, not a compliance requirement;
  2. There is no cyber insurance against loss of reputation, this should not be about the money; and
  3. Any security vendor offering “GDPR Compliance” is at best telling you 5% of the story, at worst, is lying to you.

While I agree it may be difficult to sort through the good advice and the crap when it come to this stuff, there is no excuse for  doing nothing. GDPR and every regulation to come will not change the basics, security will be same regardless.

The issue is not regulation, it’s that organisations still aren’t asking the right questions.

[If you liked this article, please share! Want more like it, subscribe!]

PCI, You Have Chosen Poorly

PCI DSS, You Brought It On Yourselves

I have never hidden my disdain for the PCI DSS, and have written numerous blogs as to why. Not just whinging mind you, I have always included a stab at providing solutions or alternatives. But every now and again, I have to remind myself why the DSS even exists in the first place. And who needs to accept a sizeable chunk of the responsibility for it.

It’s you Mr. Retail, and you Mr. E-Commerce, and especially you Mr. Service Provider. You are every bit as culpable as the Card Brands.

Yes, the payment card technology is 50+ years old, and hopelessly outdated. Yes it’s a ridiculous way of paying now that there are so many better ways. And yes, it’s very difficult to protect cardholder data, but it’s really not complicated. All it took was effort.

But organisations didn’t make any effort. For decades on end. From stand-alone terminals, to integrated points of sale, to e-commerce, and now to mobile, the threat landscape has changed beyond measure. The corresponding risk management programs have done next to nothing.

Let’s take a quick look at the causes of 3 of the worst card data breaches to date:

  1. T.J. Maxx (2007 – 45.7M Primary Account Numbers (PANs) compromised) – I know this one’s going back a bit, but it’s one of those rare examples of where the PCI DSS was [mostly] up to speed with the prevailing threat landscape. The breach was caused by weak encryption on their wireless access points. Although Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) was:
    o
    i)   known to be vulnerable way back in 2001;
    ii)  replaced by WPA in 2003;
    iii) deprecated by the IEEE in 2004, and;
    iv) addressed specifically in the DSS from as early as v1.0 – “4.1.1 For wireless networks transmitting cardholder data, encrypt the transmissions by using Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) technology if WPA capable, or VPN or SSL at 128-bit. Never rely exclusively on WEP to protect confidentiality and access to a wireless LAN.
    o
    …T.J.Maxx still had WEP as its standard. This vulnerability (plus horrifically poor network segmentation) lead to the compromise. It also took T.J.Maxx 18 MONTHS to find out.
    o
  2. Target (2013 – 40M PANs compromised) – Network access credentials stolen from a 3rd party and used to remotely log in to systems in-scope for PCI. An HVAC provider at that! Where to even begin on where Target went wrong?! But we can assume:
    o
    i)   vendor due diligence and management was sub-standard (addressed in Requirements 12.8.x);
    ii)  vendor access standards and monitoring were not in place (addressed in Requirements 8.1.5.a, 8.1.5.b, and 8.3.2.a);
    iii) change detection mechanisms were either not in place, or ineffective (addressed in Requirements 6.4.x);
    iv)  logging and monitoring mechanisms were either not in place, or ineffective (addressed in Requirements 10.x), and;
    v)   network segmentation was inadequate.
    o
  3. Home Depot (2014 – 56M PANs compromised) – Similar to Target, which makes this one even more embarrassing and unforgivable.

If we were to look at the thousands of other breaches that have occurred we would find little difference. It’s not so much concerted attacks from dedicated and skilled hackers that’s the problem, it’s the complete disregard for basic security practices by the vast majority of organisations. Organisations who KNOW better, but have chosen instead to just roll the dice.

I’m not saying that these three examples were not perpetrated by skilled hackers, but the level of skill required was significantly less than it should have been. In fact, if these organisations only had DSS levels of security controls in place, the attacks would have significantly more difficult. REAL security would have made these targets of last resort.

What Are You Going to Do About It?

As the South Africans say; If you want security, build your fence higher than your neighbour’s.” The reason the PCI DSS exists is because no one was building any fences!

The right things to do for security have, quite literally, been written down for generations. Ignore these basics and the upcoming regulations related to privacy will make PCI look like a walk in the park by comparison.

[If you liked this article, please share! Want more like it, subscribe!]

The Evolution of the PCI DSS, From v1.1 to v3.2

In honour of the SSC’s 10th year in power [oops!] business, I thought it would be interesting to run a little retrospective.

On December 15th, 2004, a day that will live in infamy, Visa released the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) v1.0.

~2 years later, the PCI Security Standards Council (SSC) was formed, closely followed by the release of DSS v1.1.

Six iterations later, here we are at v3.2.

To emphasise yet again just how sad I am, I chose to map v1.1 against not just the v3.2 standard itself, but its corresponding Report on Compliance (RoC) Reporting Template . While this seems like an extreme comparison (download it here), I wanted to get the full flavour of just how PCI compliance assessments have evolved in the 10 years since v1.1’s debut.

At first blush, they would appear to be radically different. For a start, v1.1 was just 17 pages long, v3.2 is 139 pages, and the RoC Reporting Template is a whopping 198 pages! But what becomes clear very quickly is that most of the changes are related to assessment guidance, validation guidance, and wave after wave of clarifications.

I mean, seriously, excluding the Bill of Rights the US Constitution has only been amended 17 times in 227 years!

Take Requirement 1.1.1 for example, this is what v3.2 looks like in the v3.2 RoC Reporting Template:

Screen Shot 2016-08-10 at 10.46.04

This is from v1.1:

Screen Shot 2016-08-10 at 10.39.46

Radically different, right?

Not really, everything in 1.1.1.a – 1.1.1.c is validation guidance, nothing more. In other words, if the original v1.1 assessors were doing a good job, this is how they would have assessed their clients back in 2006.

But they weren’t doing a good job. Not even close. Even into v1.2 QSAs were still filling out ‘Yes’ for in-place and ‘No’ for not-in place.

What we have seen from v1.2 onwards is the gradual increase in detail related to the validation that has to be performed. From v2.0, a separate document was provided to QSAs, the ‘ROC Reporting Instructions for PCI DSS v2.0‘ that broke down what was expected during compliance validation.

This was also implemented poorly by a lot of QSA companies, while others were clearly unaware of its very existence.

Roll on DSS v3.0, the version that caused by far the biggest stir in the PCI community since the DSS’s initial release. There were shouts from the merchants that the SSC had just raised the bar to unacceptable heights. There were even complaints from QSAs that the ‘new’ instructions would increase the workload to the point assessments would be unprofitable. And worst of all, the more unscrupulous QSA companies actually raised their prices! Here are my thoughts on those companies; PCI DSS v3.0 – Do NOT Pay More For Your QSA Services!

The fact is that v3.0 was a consolidation of the DSS Requirements and the Reporting Instructions, and little more (detailed mapping here). If the QSAs and the organisations they were assessing had been performing assessments properly, the effects would have been minimal.

How Similar is v1.1 to v3.2?

About 82% according to my calculation. Obviously this is at the overarching control level, not the validation detail. v1.1 had exactly zero guidance in that regard.

Other than some wording and requirement numbering changes the controls have remained remarkably consistent.

…and the ‘major’ changes aren’t really that major. Certainly nothing outside of basic common sense:

  1. Req. 1.1.3  – Cardholder Data Flow Diagrams – [How would you determine scope in the first place?]
  2. Req. 2.4    – Asset Inventory – [Seriously, how could you possibly achieve PCI compliance without one?]
  3. Req. 5.x    – Make sure anti-virus are actively running etc. – [Really!?]
  4. Req. 7.x     – Additional requirements around job classification etc. – [RBAC is RBAC, this should never have needed changing.]
  5. Req. 8.6    – ‘Other’ Authentication Mechanisms – [About time non-password stuff was introduced.]
  6. Req. 9.3    – Physical access based on job function – [As opposed to?]
  7. Req. 9.9     – Protection of Terminals (only affects retail) – [Sigh…]
  8. …etc…

So What Are You Saying?

There are two ways to look at these results:

  1. The main controls of the DSS were correct from the very beginning and there has been no change in either the threat landscape, or security technology; and
    o
  2.  The card schemes do not WANT to make significant changes, because they already consider the controls to be risk reduction enough. Not to mention the poo-storm that would descend on them if they did.

I think we all know that the first option isn’t true, so that leaves the second. And can you really blame them? Besides, what does it really matter, the DSS will never have the opportunity to improve much beyond minor clarifications. Payment cards just don’t have enough life-span to warrant anything else.

Nothing more to add really, now I need to go get a life.

[If you liked this article, please share! Want more like it, subscribe!]

PCI SSC: Effective Daily Log Monitoring

PCI SSC: ‘Effective Daily Log Monitoring Supplement’ – They Missed Again

The SSC released their Information Supplement ‘Effective Daily Log Monitoring‘ in MAY, and I’m only just hearing about it now! Either I’m completely out of the loop (not being a QSA) or the SSC did a very poor job PR-ing it.

I think I understand which it is now that I’ve read it.

Anyway, despite the blatant oxymoron in the document’s title, and my own predisposition toward negative bias where the SSC is concerned, I was still hoping to be pleasantly surprised.

I wasn’t, but nor was I as horrified as I have been while reading output from other SIGs.

It’s actually a really good beginner’s guide to logging, but it’s completely unsupported by the DSS in its current form. And it’s not just me looking for faults, they have not put logging into a proper, or even accurate, context to the DSS requirements as written. With their knowledge of best practice, they basically made the rookie mistake of assuming requirements mean more than they do.

To be clear; If it’s not specifically spelled out in the standard, it is not mandatory. Period / full stop. Even if it’s the right thing to do.

For example: There is no requirement for any automated alerting. Not from firewalls, not from A/V, not from IDS, not from FIM, and not from ‘system components’ like servers and applications. So the statement; “The PCI DSS recognizes the importance of proactive monitoring of security logs in the detection of attacks on information assets and the protection of those assets from compromise.” is inaccurate. The SSC might recognise the importance of pro-active monitoring, the SIG’s participants clearly do, but the DSS only recognises the need for what amounts to forensic evidence. Nothing more.

The DSS uses the word ‘alert’ in only 6 relevant Requirements:

  • 6.6  For public-facing web applications, ensure that either one of the following methods is in place as follows:

• Examine the system configuration settings and interview responsible personnel to verify that an automated technical solution that detects and prevents web-based attacks (for example, a web-application firewall) is in place as follows:

– Is configured to either block web-based attacks, or generate an alert that is immediately investigated.” – [Alerts are non-mandatory, and can be manually generated.]

  • 10.5.5  Use file-integrity monitoring or change-detection software on logs to ensure that existing log data cannot be changed without generating alerts (although new data being added should not cause an alert).” – [No time-period defined, so you have to assume weekly like 11.5, or at most daily like 10.6. Alerts can be manualy generated.]
    o
  • 10.6 Review logs and security events for all system components to identify anomalies or suspicious activity.

Note: Log harvesting, parsing, and alerting tools may be used to meet this Requirement.” – [Non-mandatory]

  • 11.1.d  If automated monitoring is utilized (for example, wireless IDS/IPS, NAC, etc.), verify the configuration will generate alerts to notify personnel.” – [Non-mandatory, and/or no time-period defined.]
    o
  • 11.4  Use intrusion-detection systems and/or intrusion-prevention techniques to detect and/or prevent intrusions into the network. Monitor all traffic at the perimeter of the cardholder data environment as well as at critical points in the cardholder data environment, and alert personnel to suspected compromises.” – [Alert how? Automatically or during a daily review?]
    o
  • 11.5  Deploy a change-detection mechanism (for example, file-integrity monitoring tools) to alert personnel to unauthorized modification (including changes, additions and deletions) of critical system files, configuration files, or content files; and configure the software to perform critical file comparisons at least weekly.” – [Weekly notification, so clearly does not require automation.]

So if there’s no requirement for automatically generated alerts, and daily is the maximum defined review timeframe, how can they possibly insist on 24/7 availability related to Incident Response (DSS Req. 12.10.3)? Who is going to choose 2AM for their daily review?

Even the SIG makes the statement; “Without automated alerting mechanisms, it is almost impossible to identify and alert about such events in near real-time.“. In other words, in time to actually do something about it before it gets out of hand.

But I thought this was about effective DAILY log monitoring?

So All In All…

The thing that still confuses me most, is that the DSS is full of mandatory technologies, but a manual and daily review of logs is still OK?! Not one technology in the DSS is required to be utilised properly, and some have significantly less benefit than a Security Incident & Event Management (SIEM) or an equivalent managed service:

  • why require firewalls and routers then don’t mandate review of the traffic logs?
  • why require an asset database, but not an asset management system on which every other security processes can rely?
  • anti-malware is based on signatures so is all but useless
  • intrusion detection is pointless unless the entire infrastructure is baselined to a known-good
  • …and so on.

So of ALL requirements, how can centralised logging and automated alerts not be mandatory?

This post in already too long, and I’ve barely begun to scratch to surface of why logging and monitoring is so important.

There’s no escaping that the document name; ‘Effective Daily Log Monitoring‘ is misleading, it should be called the ‘We Cannot Tell You to Buy a SIEM, But Good Luck Getting Compliant Without One‘. Basically the SSC has all but admitted that the logging and monitoring requirements are completely inadequate, but can think of no way to change them in the DSS. Not without pissing off a lot of people anyway.

Finally, it IS  a good document, worth a read, and kudos to the authors. Unfortunately it’s guidance is meaningless to those without the means to perform anything other than manual daily reviews.

Bonus Material

If you’re interested, I have provided some additional thoughts in my own Logging Supplement document. There are 3 sections:

  1. Breakdown of Existing DSS Logging & Alerting (Non-Server) – There are 5 DSS requirements outside of the established logging and alerting requirements, and are ambiguous at best. They are also not covered appropriately in the SSC’s Supplement.
    o
  2. Missing from the DSS – The SSC’s Supplement did not cover daily review appropriately, nor did then then go far enough to cover appropriate automation. This section covers a few of the major benefits of logging and monitoring properly.
    o
  3. Automating the Daily Review – There are only three processes required to automate the daily review, but it cannot be done without centralised logging and scripting skills, a managed service, or a SIEM.

[If you liked this article, please share! Want more like it, subscribe!]

PCI DSS v3.2 vs CIS Critical Security Controls v6.0

A few months ago, while incredibly bored, I decided to perform my own mapping of the PCI DSS v3.2 to ISO 27001:2013.

I know what you’re going to say; “You can’t compare the two, one’s a management framework, the other’s a controls-based assessment standard!” I agree with you, however, it IS possible to map PCI’s Control Requirements to the ISO’s Control Objectives.

The DSS did not fare well; PCI DSS v3.2 vs ISO 27001-2013

This is not surprising really, the PCI DSS was never designed to be a security framework. It was designed to reduce the risk of card holder data loss to acceptable levels, and nothing more. Whether or not it has succeeded is a debate for the ages, and any frequent readers of my blog will know where I stand.

This week I found myself bored yet again, so I decided to give the DSS another shot at matching up to an ‘industry-accepted’ standard. This time I chose the CIS Critical Security Controls (CSC) v6.0 which, by definition, should have given the DSS a shot at redeeming itself.

It didn’t; PCI DSS_v3.2 vs CIS Critical Security Controls_v6.0

In the DSS’s defence, this is not a fair apples-to-apples comparison either, for 2 main reasons:

  1. The DSS is not a 100% controls-based standard, the CIS CSC is. The DSS, quite rightly, includes a significant chunk of policy and procedure, only a reverse mapping would give the full picture.
    o
  2. The CIS CSC includes a significant number of technologies ill-suited for all but the most advanced and mature environments. Not to mention those with unlimited budgets. The PCI DSS was written to be understood by as many people, and be as universally affordable, as possible.

That said, we can certainly make some observations that illuminate some of the PCI DSS’s more significant deficiencies:

  1.  Data Protection (CSC 13): 18% coverage – Rather ironic, but the entire raison d’être for the DSS; protection of card holder data, scores the lowest in terms of controls requirements. While CSC 13 does not include as much encryption as the DSS, the lack of Data Loss Prevention (DLP) techniques in the DSS is starkly transparent. The DSS has never even mentioned DLP in the main body, or even alluded to it in the “Scope of PCI DSS Requirements“. Only the Designated Entities Supplemental Validation (DESV) section mentions it, and that only in the Guidance as an option.

  2. Inventory of Authorized and Unauthorized Devices CSC 1 & Software (CSC 2)20% coverage – Asset Management is at the heart of every security program, nothing else can possibly function without it. The requirement for an asset register was not added to the DSS until v3.0. Along with Logging & Monitoring, the PCI minimums related to asset management are the most damaging to the overall program. Automation and alerting are both next to impossible without the baselines the asset register should provide.

  3. Malware Defences (CSC 8): 27% coverage – The DSS focuses almost entirely on anti-malware, and that almost exclusively on Windows. That’s what they mean by “…commonly affected by malicious software” in Requirement 5.1. Base-lining, white-listing, black-listing and so on aren’t featured in the DSS, because with asset management there is no way to track what should and should not be there.

  4. Security Skills Assessment and Appropriate Training to Fill Gaps (CSC 17): 28% coverage – This one is truly unconscionable given the enormous power of education and training. Security Awareness means nothing unless it’s in appropriate context to the individual taking it. One size does not fit all, and PCI would be wise to take note.

Clearly I have a significant bias against the PCI DSS in general, so I would welcome any counter-argument from others who are equally bored.

Now I have to go find something else to do..